Books

Since 1982, I have reread one particular book about every ten years. Can you guess which one?

Hints: A scarf and “not a hat”

Answer at bottom!

My nightstand is home to a variety of half-read books. The topic I select depends on my mood. Sometimes I engage in “appetizer sampling” and sometimes I dig into one delicious main course. Fellow bookworms understand when I say that “The End” just means “The Beginning” for yet another book to be discovered and devoured.

Somanybooks

So many books, so little time…

I’m a traditional hard copy, paper book gal. There’s something about the familiar form and weight of holding a physical book in my hands, mindfully dog-earing the pages and having the progressive visual of how close I am to completion. There are some books I love to revisit, some I wish could go on forever and some I just want to bring across the finish line and donate to the local Goodwill.

I read voraciously after my diagnosis. Most of it was online and much of it was conflicting information. Part of the reason was because I was searching with incomplete information. There were some facts I wouldn’t learn until after the surgery.

What helped: My surgical recovery phase allowed me to do a deep dive and COMPLETE multiple books. Some were gifted to me and some recommended as useful by others touched by cancer. I benefited from the specialized advice, nourishing recipes, traditional and non-traditional approaches, real patient stories and multiple research findings. Favorites included:

  • The Cancer Revolution by Dr. Leigh Erin Connealy
    • I liked the comprehensive nature of different approaches and their descriptions, plus the eating plans, recipe section, glossary and extensive footnotes.
  • The China Study Cookbook by LeAnne Campbell
    • I enjoyed the wide assortment of plant-based recipes and nutritional information.
  • How Healing Works by Wayne Jonas, MD
    • I loved the history he shared, how to heal with your environment and real-life patient stories.
  • It’s Not About the Hair: And Other Certainties of Life & Cancer by Debra Jarvis
    • I appreciated her humor, candor and openness in sharing her group emails and lessons learned along the way.
  • WHEN: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing by Daniel H. Pink
    • This was not cancer-specific, however, it was extremely valuable to me as my return to work approached. I was still very tired, but this book offered strategies to better harness my natural energy phases. You can check out the book’s core message and the power of a “Nappuccino,” HERE.

      morefriends

      More old friends…

What I wish I knew at the time: Audiobooks! Of course I knew about audiobooks, but I’d never actually listened to any. They would have been a convenient delivery system of informational resources on my work commute in the first weeks after diagnosis.

Some things to try:

  • Check out one of the books listed above, if appropriate for you or someone you care about.
  • The next time you fly, use it as an opportunity to finish at least one book. Watch how it transforms the early arrivals, unexpected flight delays and long layovers into a more positive and satisfying experience. Pick one you’ve been wanting to sink your teeth into – you know the one. It elicits the “Just two more pages…” response.
  • When it makes sense, layer! Since my brother and his family got me a six-month membership, I’ve become a big fan of the audiobook. I recently heard Tony Robbins use the term, NET: No Extra Time. He was talking about time management strategies. Life is busier than ever these days, so listening to an audiobook is an example of utilizing time that you’re already engaged in doing something (driving, working out, cooking, cleaning) and layering on some learning that can benefit you (and possibly reduce some stress, depending on the topic!) without taking up any extra time.
  • Block time for down time. Although books and audiobooks are enriching in so many ways, it’s important to schedule regular doses of “white space” or “waking rest” into each day. This relaxing, agenda-free “down time” allows your brain to better process the multitude of learnings and experiences, increase the flow of creative insights and productivity and restore and relax your nervous system.

Answer to Intro Question: It is The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry! I first read this on my 7th grade school bus (no talking was allowed that year, so plenty of time to read). It profoundly affected me. I stumbled upon it again after college and understood even deeper aspects of the story after a decade of life experiences. Since then, I commit to rediscovering it (and myself!) as I welcome in each new decade.

Which book do you reread and why? List in the comment section below.

Next Up: Cats!

Medical Disclaimer: This blog is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Medical advice must only be obtained from a physician or qualified health professional.

Geri Ann Higgins, owner of Fully Present, is a breast cancer survivor, Certified Health & Wellness Coach, Registered Yoga Teacher, Certified Yoga4Cancer Teacher, Reiki Master, Tarot coach and Marketing & Communications professional. Learn more at http://www.FullyPresentwithYou.com.

4 thoughts on “Books

  1. Haha. I just started rereading The Thorn Birds…i also reread Nevil Shute books year after year. And I just reread every Georgette Heyer! None of these are deeply intellectual, but all put me in a comfortable place. They are all books I have been rereading since my teen years and I never tire of them.

    Like

    • Wow, The Thorn Birds! What a story… I know about Nevil Shute, but not Georgette Heyer.
      I like you what you said about certain stories putting you in a comfortable place. Such a powerful tool to help us reconnect to different ways and states of being. Thanks for sharing!

      Like

  2. Nice! What???!! No talking on the school bus? That’s like torture! And this ” having the progressive visual of how close I am to completion” I knew there was something else in why I prefer books – Yes! looking to see how far I am and how far I have to go. Have you ever delayed reading so the book wouldn’t end?

    Like

    • Haha, yes, it was difficult, especially as a talkative kid! Oh, yes, I have definitely put off finishing because I didn’t want my time with the characters to end… books are magical!

      Liked by 1 person

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